Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents ‘it feels right to me’

Posted on April 27th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Wednesday 24 May, 8.45pm
GFT, Glasgow
Book Tickets, £9.50/ 7.50 concessions

This screening programme brings together live performance with artist moving image in a transatlantic coupling to explore multiple interpretations of Eros in contemporary art practice, with works from Nicole MillerKimberley O’Neill, Jacolby SatterwhiteDanielle Dean and Ursula Mayer. Positioning the event within the female experience and gathering the artworks under three erotic propositions; pleasure, perversion and assembly, the selected artists use ‘worldbuilding’ or in-between states to focus on Eros’ capabilities as a life force and as a mechanism of dissent.

The evening will also extend out from the screen with a new performance work chiffon sponge by Newcastle – based artist Nicola Singh in which images and words meet to apply direct and difficult pressure onto each other. The performance will use video projection, song and text to explore tense or hidden desires.

it feels right to me acknowledges the strength of the erotic into a true knowledge one that is difficult to explain in words but has a certain spiritualism that resides deep in the human psyche. It is a recalibration of the erotic beyond the explicit moving towards a life force in bodily desire.

This screening programme is drawn from artist curator Gayle Meikle’s current research into Eros as a guiding curatorial and institutional positioning.  The title it feels right to me is a quote taken from Audre Lorde’s 1984 publication Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches.

Gayle Meikle is an artist curator based out of Newcastle Upon Tyne where she is undertaking a PhD in Fine Art exploring how a feminist art practice might speculate on multiple forms of a university gallery.

Image: Nicola Singh and Harriet Plewis, they go into a little room and they play a little drum, 2017, BALTIC 39, Newcastle (photo credit: Fiona Larkin).

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents ‘From the Interior’

Posted on April 26th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Thursday 25 May, 6.30-8pm
CCA Cinema, Glasgow
Free, but ticketed via Eventbrite

Telling stories from northern Midwest America. From award winning dog mushers to beloved pets, the felling of a neighborhood tree to the de-forestation of an entire region, this programme of eight short films highlights the concerns, affections, fears and curiosities of multiple artists based in the richly diverse Minnesota region, including:

Tree Work
By Kevin Obsatz
7 min | 2016 | Sound | Colour | Digital | USA
A document of the diligent and dangerous work of Minneapolis Arborists, and the last day of an old, dying tree in my front yard. Tree Work is a personal, autobiographical film about the changing landscapes of our daily lives and all the complexity we take for granted in our homes & neighborhoods.

Miss Rose Fletcher: A Natural History
By Laska Jimsen
17 min | 2007 | Sound | Colour | 16 mm | USA
Combining interviews and archival research with the lyricism of experimental film processes, Jimsen investigates the histories of several generations of residents living in Oregon’s once idyllic Willamette Valley, which is now giving way to industry and suburbia. Through a series of vignettes, two iconic figures emerge: Darrel Ebbert, a trapper and sheep farmer, and Vida Bullis, a dahlia breeder.

Kenilworth Sketch
By Sam Hoolihan
6 min | 2015 | Silent | Colour | 16 mm | USA
A silent meditation on light, time, and landscape.

O.U.R Ford
By Trevor Adams
6 min | 1998 | Silent | Colour | 16 mm | USA
A film portrait of my Grandparents. Margaret and Ike Nickel, were 1st generation immigrants from Germany who settled in a Mennonite community in the Midwest in the 1930’s.

SASKATCHEWAN
By Richard Wiebe
16min | 2011 | Sound | Colour | Digital | Canada, USA
16mm footage and Edison Voicewriter recordings introduce to me a family I never knew. I see my dad, age 7 in 1943, stand in front of a movie camera. I see my grandparents, my aunt, my uncle and others now gone. I was born in North Carolina, decades later, but I imagine the movie we would make together about Saskatchewan.

White Dog
By Rini Yun Keagy
4.5 min | 2015 | Silent | Colour | Digital | USA
Soft white fur, gentle face. Four white legs, moving, elated. A human’s touch. A phantom. Before and after. A snug abode, another caress. Sock, a bandage. Four white legs, moving. Hide the malady. After and before. White leg, bare skin. White dog. Black matter.

The Interior
By Jonathan Rattner
23 min | 2015 | Sound | Colour | Digital | USA
Centered on the visual, sonic, and physical world of Brent Sass, an award-winning dog musher and Minnesota native, The Interior explores Sass’s homestead in Eureka Alaska, where he and his 56 dogs live and work. Rattner portrays the essence of what it’s like to live in a secluded landscape that is ripe with raw meat, snoring dogs, and frozen air.

Beaver Creek Yard
By Laska Jimsen
5.5 min | 2013 | Sound | Colour | Digital | USA
Exploring the human impulse to control, exploit, and profit from the natural world, Jimsen portrays a Christmas tree processing facility on Beaver Creek Road.

Programmed by Ruth Hodgins, programmer/ archivist, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

Image: Jonathan Rattner’s The Interior, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents Evan Ifekoya, ‘She Was a Full Body Speaker’ & Selected Shorts

Posted on April 23rd, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Saturday 10 June, 7.00pm
Summerhall Red Lecture Theatre, Edinburgh
Free, but ticketed via Eventbrite

LUX Scotland is pleased to present She Was a Full Body Speaker by interdisciplinary artist Evan Ifekoya.

Combining found footage from Rewind/Fast Forward with the artists’ personal archive, She Was a Full Body Speaker addresses blackness, sociality and inheritance diffracted through queer nightlife and trauma as an endless repetition.

A series of shorts selected by Evan Ifekoya will screen as part of the event, including Ursula ​MayerMedea (2013), Marlon RiggsAnthem (1991) and Alia SyedFatima’s Letter (1992).

Following the screening Evan Ifekoya will be in conversation with writer and lecturer Laura Guy.

This event takes place on the closing weekend of Evan Ifekoya’s solo exhibition A Net Made of Individual Knots at Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh.

She Was a Full Body Speaker has been made with a package of support from BFI, no.w.here and Wellcome Trust as part of the Queering love, Queering hormones project and a grant from Heritage Lottery Fund as part of Rewind/Fast Forward. Thank you to Sandi Hughes for providing access to the Rewind/Fast Forward archive and to James Holcombe for the invaluable technical support at no.w.here, Bethnal Green, London.

Image: Evan Ifekoya, She Was A Full Body Speaker, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

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