Events / News / Screening
Event: LUX Scotland presents George Clark, ‘On The Planter’s Art: An illustrated talk on films, maps and gardening’

Posted on June 27th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Friday 30 June, 3pm
The Mitchell Library, Glasgow
Free, ticketed via Eventbrite

‘I am told there are people who do not care for maps, and find it hard to believe; here is an inexhaustible fund of interest for any man with eyes to see or twopence-worth of imagination to understand with!’ – Robert Louis Stevenson

‘The map does not reproduce an unconscious closed in upon itself; it constructs the unconscious’ – Gilles Deleuze

Artist and curator George Clark will present this illustrated lecture looking at ideas of perspective, categorisation and interpretation in cinema and art. Drawing from research for his ongoing film projects in Hong Kong and Los Angeles, he will present and discuss a diverse range of subjects from the 16mm Kodachome films of Californian gardener Albert Wilson, the history of bird watching and illustration in colonial Hong Kong and the visionary 1980 Centre Pompidou exhibition on cartography Maps and Figures of the Earth/Cartes et figures de la Terre. Central to the talk is exploration of maps as ‘instruments of travel and discovery, as well as sophisticated tools to dream.’ The presentation will draw on the writings of Jorge Luis-Borges and Gilles Deleuze, film work by South American emigres in Paris such as Hugo Santiago and David Lamelas and Raul Ruiz’s rare film on maps and labyrinths made to accompany the Pompidou exhibition.

George Clark is an artist and curator. Recent work includes the film A Distant Echo (2016), which explores myth, history, and ecology in the desert, and the film Sea of Clouds / 雲海 (2016), which is structured around an interview with artist Chen Chieh-jen. His solo exhibition A Planter’s Art featured a new series of moving image works installed alongside a specially cultivated garden in Taiwan, and his ongoing project Eyemo Rolls draws on a growing body of 35mm films shown in dialog with other works as means to think about place and entanglement. He has curated projects for museums, galleries, cinemas, and festivals with a focus on broadening the histories of film and video practice globally. Through his work at Tate Modern (2013-2015) and in independent projects, he has curated retrospectives of Ute Aurand, Julian Dashper, Lav Diaz, Camille Henrot, Vlado Kristl, Luis Ospina, and Chick Strand, as well as thematic exhibitions on Japanese expanded cinema (with Julian Ross and Go Hirasawa), the L.A. Rebellion, and Infermental, the first magazine on videocassette (with Dan Kidner and James Richards).

Image: Cartes Et Figures De La Terre, catalogue cover, Centre Georges Pompidou, 1980.

Events / News / Screening
Event: LUX Scotland presents ‘What we learn in the shadows’: a dialogue between Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay & Liz Rosenfeld

Posted on June 25th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Sunday 2 July, 2pm
CCA Clubroom, Glasgow
Free, ticketed via Eventbrite

The aesthetics of cruising extend far beyond the spaces and situations in which the hunt for sex takes place, offering itself as a means of threshold crossing, as an invitation in experimentation and empathy, and as a spiritual practice of acceptance and non-attachment. Cruising is a register of awareness, a mode of being, a gestural vocabulary replete with actions and inactions that subvert productive, normative ways of moving through space: stalling, idling, looping, back-tracking, pausing, watching, revealing, concealing, communicating non-verbally, abandoning.

Cruising exists both as subject and methodology throughout the artistic practices of both Liz Rosenfeld (Berlin) and Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay (Edinburgh), expressing itself not only in media and performance works, but also as an approach to research, writing, and of course, living.

Rosenfeld and Nemerofsky meet to talk, touch, and feel their way through the diverse ways cruising intersects in their lives and practices.

Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay is an artist and diarist. His artistic gestures in sound, video and text contemplate the history of song and the gender of voices, the rendering of love and emotion into language, and the resurrection and manipulation of voices – sung, spoken or screamed. In his work you will find bells, bouquets, enchanted forests, folding screens, gay elders, glitter, gold leaf, love letters, imaginary paintings, madrigals, megaphones, mirrors, naked men, sign language, subtitles, and the voices of birds, boy sopranos, contraltos, countertenors and sirens. His work is in the permanent collection of the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, the Polin Museum for the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, Thielska Galleriet Stockholm and the National Gallery of Canada. Nemerofsky is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Edinburgh, where he is part of the Cruising the 70s: Unearthing Pre-HIV/AIDS Queer Sexual Cultures research team.

Liz Rosenfeld is a Berlin-based artist utilising the disciplines of film, video and live performance to convey a sense of past and future histories. Rosenfeld is invested in concepts of how history can be queered and experienced through the moment and ways in which it is lived and remembered. She explores how we identify ourselves with in/out community and social poly-relationship configurations. Rosenfeld is part of the Berlin-based moving image production collective NowMomentNow and is currently the Goethe Institut Artist in Residence at LUX. During her residency, Liz will continue her creative body of research that she has been developing for the past year and a half for her first feature film, a futuristic queer speculative fiction work entitled FOXES. Central to her research are questions exploring queer dystopia, a positive embrace of human apocalypse, invisible genocide and the parallels between the way information was publicly disseminated in the early days of the AIDS/ HIV crisis, and the current state of climate change and environmental destruction.

Image: Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay, Grand Audrelisque, 2016. Courtesy of the artist.

Events / News / Screening
LUX Scotland presents: Culture and Matter with Steven Claydon

Posted on June 24th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Wednesday 5 July, 7pm
Tramway, Glasgow
£3, ticketed via Tramway (transaction fees £1 online, £1.50 by phone)

LUX Scotland presents a screening of work by artist Steven Claydon to coincide with his current exhibitions at The Common Guild and Mount Stuart Trust. Unfolding a set of ongoing concerns explored across both exhibitions, this selection of films pushes and pulls at the rupture between the elemental materiality of things and the shifting values, histories and meanings that we assign to them. The programme will include Claydon’s recent commission for Art Sheffield 2016, Infra-idol Assembly, and will be followed by a Q&A with the artist.

Image: Steven Claydon, The Ancient Set, 2008. Courtesy of the artist and LUX.

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents ‘The Discreet Body’

Posted on June 22nd, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Tuesday 18 July, 7pm
Transmission, Glasgow
Free, ticketed via Eventbrite

This collection of works considers the sometimes overlooked, but no less significant, experiences pertaining to gendered space, professionalism, the importance of gender visibility, as well as the desire not to be seen.

These videos by Lucy Clout; Women in Manual Trades; and Vanalyne Green, and film by Rosalind Nashashibi, access such subjects with diverse and subversive approaches, and cast light over ideas and issues of public space and women’s experience within it, which often fall between the cracks.

Curated by Alice Lea, first shown at LUX in June 2016.

Programme:

Lucy Clout, From Our Own Correspondent, 2015, HD video, colour, sound, UK / USA, 10mins

The video begins with an animated woman (a profile) who is simultaneously rehearsing alone in a hotel room and replaying her day. She nods and grimaces along to imagined subjects testimony, performing private rituals of productivity and inactivity in a half-dressed state. In the final section that same profile tells a story in which her own sexual life is intermingled with the (retroactively) shame-filled direct messages of a disgraced politician. The work is interested in pleasure, comfort, shame and the desire to be both witnessed and unseen. It’s a video about being and not being intertwined with others, it is about what a woman might need from other people and how she might go about getting it.

Commissioned as part of the Jerwood/FVU Awards. A collaboration between Jerwood Charitable Foundation and FVU in association with CCA, Glasgow and University of East London. FVU is supported by Arts Council England.

Women in Manual Trades, Building Your Future, 1980, SD video, colour, sound, UK, 27mins

This tape is about women working in the building industry. A series of interviews with a plumber; plasterer; carpenter; bricklayer; electrician; a painter and decorator, who speak of their experiences and interests, from joining the profession to aspirations for their future careers.

Vanalyne Green, A Spy in the House that Ruth Built, 1989, SD video, colour, sound, USA, 29mins

Inspired by art historian Carol Duncan’s ideas about how public spaces are gendered and by artist Fred Lonidier’s observation that socially progressive artists rarely seize on sports as subject matter for their art, I wanted to create something that could take baseball’s symbolism and stand it on its head — its womblike stadiums and its cycles and rituals. And I wanted to make something that perhaps could be funny, heretical and yet devoted to a sport I love. VG

Rosalind Nashashibi, This Quality, 2010, 16mm, colour, sound, UK, 5mins

This Quality is a film shot in downtown Cairo. It comprises two halves: the first shows a 30-something woman looking directly at the camera, and sometimes acknowledging the existence of others around her who we cannot see. She has a beautiful face with eyes which seem to see internally rather than outwardly, they almost have the appearance of being painted on, suggesting the blindness of a mythological seer. The second half shows a series of parked cars covered with fabric. Each car suggests a sightless face, as the fabric stretched around the machine turns it into a face but also seems to hood the car so that it is conspicuously hidden, like a child covering his eyes.

 

Image: Rosalind Nashashibi, This Quality, 2010. Courtesy of the artist and LUX.

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents ‘The future, in a choral style’

Posted on June 20th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Sunday 30 July, 7.45pm
GFT, Glasgow
Tickets available soon

What does it mean to sustain yourself as an artist? How is a creative practice sustained over time? This event presents a selection of artist moving image and sound that explores the cinema as a potent space for reflection on the life lived before, after and outside the artwork. Selected works spill over into the life of the artist, slowly evolving into or emerging from the conditions of subsistence to which everyone is subject, rendering them explicit or making them material.

The future, in a choral style is curated by Nick Thomas.

This screening is part of GFT’s Crossing the Line strand.

Image: Tanya Syed, Salamander, 1994. Image courtesy of the artist and LUX.

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents Queer Ecologies with Liz Rosenfeld

Posted on April 18th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Tuesday 27 June, 6.00-7.30pm
Goethe-Institut, Glasgow
Free, ticketed via Eventbrite

Berlin-based artist Liz Rosenfeld will present a programme of films selected from the LUX Collection, which speak to and inspire the themes that she is currently researching while serving as the inaugural Goethe Institut Artist in Residence at LUX. During her residency, Liz has continued her creative body of research that she has been developing for the past year and a half regarding the themes and characters of her first feature film, a futuristic queer speculative fiction work entitled FOXES. Central to her research are questions exploring queer dystopia, a positive embrace of human apocalypse, invisible genocide and the parallels between the way information was publicly disseminated in the early days of the AIDS/ HIV crisis, and the current state of climate change and environmental destruction. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Nicole Yip, Director of LUX Scotland, and an informal discussion with the audience.

Programme:

Jenny Okun, Waves, 1978, 16mm, 3 min

Waves was hand wound though the camera backwards and forwards as the waves on a beach built up and broke on the shore.

Semiconductor, 20HZ, 2011, HD + HD 3D single channel, 5 min

20HZ observes a geo-magnetic storm occurring in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Working with data collected from the CARISMA radio array and interpreted as audio, we hear tweeting and rumbles caused by incoming solar wind, captured at the frequency of 20 Hertz.

Jem Cohen, Drink Deep, 1991, SD video, 9 min

Drink Deep is a lyrical vision of friendship, hidden secrets, and desires. Cohen uses several types of film image to add texture to the layered composition. Beautiful shades of grey, silver, black and blue echo the water, reminiscent of early photography and silverprints.

Grace Ndiritu, Natural Disasters: Urban Myths, Urban Legends,  2007, SD video, 6 min
Grace Ndiritu, Natural Disasters No. 2 Tremor, 2007, SD video, 2 min 22 sec
Grace Ndiritu, Natural Disasters No. 3 Earthquake, 2007, SD video, 2 min 24 sec

In the Natural Disasters series nature is re-imagined through a game of absence and presence. Inner earthquakes and minor tremors, mirror ‘real’ disasters on a minute scale. The videos an attempt to continue the linage of environmental filmmaking started by the Koyaanisqatsi and Powaqqatsi films.

David Farringdon, Gentlemen, 1988, SD video, 15 min

‘I have tried to give a truthful picture of a taboo subject in an unbiased way, which I hope gives some reason to an occupation perceived by many as unreasonable – the gay sex/desire/frustrations in toilets.’ – David Farringdon

Barbara Hammer, Dyketactics, 1974, 16mm, 4 min

A popular lesbian ‘commercial,’ 110 images of sensual touching montages in A, B, C, D rolls of ‘kinaesthetic’ editing.

Luther Price, SODOM, 1989, 16mm, 25 min

SODOM is viscerally graphic and disturbing through its hypnotic mirage of human fragment absorbed in mutilation. Based on the biblical story, SODOM recreates this destruction through an editing style that lends itself to a kind of organic image breakdown, creating a collage of moving image.

Please note that this programme contains sexually explicit material that some audiences may find disturbing.

With thanks to Ann-Christine Simke and the Goethe-Institut.

Image: Luther Price, SODOM, 1989. Image courtesy of LUX and the artist.

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents Evan Ifekoya, ‘She Was a Full Body Speaker’ & Selected Shorts

Posted on April 17th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Saturday 10 June, 7.00pm
Summerhall Red Lecture Theatre, Edinburgh
Free, ticketed via Eventbrite

LUX Scotland is pleased to present She Was a Full Body Speaker by interdisciplinary artist Evan Ifekoya.

Combining found footage from Rewind/Fast Forward with the artists’ personal archive, She Was a Full Body Speaker addresses blackness, sociality and inheritance diffracted through queer nightlife and trauma as an endless repetition.

A series of shorts selected by Evan Ifekoya will screen as part of the event, including Ursula ​MayerMedea (2013), Marlon RiggsAnthem (1991) and Alia SyedFatima’s Letter (1992).

Following the screening Evan Ifekoya will be in conversation with writer and lecturer Laura Guy.

This event takes place on the closing weekend of Evan Ifekoya’s solo exhibition A Net Made of Individual Knots at Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh.

She Was a Full Body Speaker has been made with a package of support from BFI, no.w.here and Wellcome Trust as part of the Queering love, Queering hormones project and a grant from Heritage Lottery Fund as part of Rewind/Fast Forward. Thank you to Sandi Hughes for providing access to the Rewind/Fast Forward archive and to James Holcombe for the invaluable technical support at no.w.here, Bethnal Green, London.

Image: Evan Ifekoya, She Was A Full Body Speaker, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents ‘From the Interior’

Posted on April 16th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Thursday 25 May, 6.30-8pm
CCA Cinema, Glasgow
Free, but ticketed via Eventbrite

Telling stories from northern Midwest America. From award winning dog mushers to beloved pets, the felling of a neighborhood tree to the de-forestation of an entire region, this programme of eight short films highlights the concerns, affections, fears and curiosities of multiple artists based in the richly diverse Minnesota region, including:

Tree Work
By Kevin Obsatz
7 min | 2016 | Sound | Colour | Digital | USA
A document of the diligent and dangerous work of Minneapolis Arborists, and the last day of an old, dying tree in my front yard. Tree Work is a personal, autobiographical film about the changing landscapes of our daily lives and all the complexity we take for granted in our homes & neighborhoods.

Miss Rose Fletcher: A Natural History
By Laska Jimsen
17 min | 2007 | Sound | Colour | 16 mm | USA
Combining interviews and archival research with the lyricism of experimental film processes, Jimsen investigates the histories of several generations of residents living in Oregon’s once idyllic Willamette Valley, which is now giving way to industry and suburbia. Through a series of vignettes, two iconic figures emerge: Darrel Ebbert, a trapper and sheep farmer, and Vida Bullis, a dahlia breeder.

Kenilworth Sketch
By Sam Hoolihan
6 min | 2015 | Silent | Colour | 16 mm | USA
A silent meditation on light, time, and landscape.

O.U.R Ford
By Trevor Adams
6 min | 1998 | Silent | Colour | 16 mm | USA
A film portrait of my Grandparents. Margaret and Ike Nickel, were 1st generation immigrants from Germany who settled in a Mennonite community in the Midwest in the 1930’s.

SASKATCHEWAN
By Richard Wiebe
16min | 2011 | Sound | Colour | Digital | Canada, USA
16mm footage and Edison Voicewriter recordings introduce to me a family I never knew. I see my dad, age 7 in 1943, stand in front of a movie camera. I see my grandparents, my aunt, my uncle and others now gone. I was born in North Carolina, decades later, but I imagine the movie we would make together about Saskatchewan.

White Dog
By Rini Yun Keagy
4.5 min | 2015 | Silent | Colour | Digital | USA
Soft white fur, gentle face. Four white legs, moving, elated. A human’s touch. A phantom. Before and after. A snug abode, another caress. Sock, a bandage. Four white legs, moving. Hide the malady. After and before. White leg, bare skin. White dog. Black matter.

The Interior
By Jonathan Rattner
23 min | 2015 | Sound | Colour | Digital | USA
Centered on the visual, sonic, and physical world of Brent Sass, an award-winning dog musher and Minnesota native, The Interior explores Sass’s homestead in Eureka Alaska, where he and his 56 dogs live and work. Rattner portrays the essence of what it’s like to live in a secluded landscape that is ripe with raw meat, snoring dogs, and frozen air.

Beaver Creek Yard
By Laska Jimsen
5.5 min | 2013 | Sound | Colour | Digital | USA
Exploring the human impulse to control, exploit, and profit from the natural world, Jimsen portrays a Christmas tree processing facility on Beaver Creek Road.

Programmed by Ruth Hodgins, programmer/ archivist, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

Image: Jonathan Rattner’s The Interior, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.

Events / News / Screening
Screening: LUX Scotland presents ‘it feels right to me’

Posted on April 15th, 2017 by LUX Scotland

Wednesday 24 May, 8.45pm
GFT, Glasgow
Book Tickets, £9.50/ 7.50 concessions

This screening programme brings together live performance with artist moving image in a transatlantic coupling to explore multiple interpretations of Eros in contemporary art practice, with works from Nicole MillerKimberley O’Neill, Jacolby SatterwhiteDanielle Dean and Ursula Mayer. Positioning the event within the female experience and gathering the artworks under three erotic propositions; pleasure, perversion and assembly, the selected artists use ‘worldbuilding’ or in-between states to focus on Eros’ capabilities as a life force and as a mechanism of dissent.

The evening will also extend out from the screen with a new performance work chiffon sponge by Newcastle – based artist Nicola Singh in which images and words meet to apply direct and difficult pressure onto each other. The performance will use video projection, song and text to explore tense or hidden desires.

it feels right to me acknowledges the strength of the erotic into a true knowledge one that is difficult to explain in words but has a certain spiritualism that resides deep in the human psyche. It is a recalibration of the erotic beyond the explicit moving towards a life force in bodily desire.

This screening programme is drawn from artist curator Gayle Meikle’s current research into Eros as a guiding curatorial and institutional positioning.  The title it feels right to me is a quote taken from Audre Lorde’s 1984 publication Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches.

Gayle Meikle is an artist curator based out of Newcastle Upon Tyne where she is undertaking a PhD in Fine Art exploring how a feminist art practice might speculate on multiple forms of a university gallery.

Image: Nicola Singh and Harriet Plewis, they go into a little room and they play a little drum, 2017, BALTIC 39, Newcastle (photo credit: Fiona Larkin).

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