CANCELLED: Through a Different Lens / Film Work by Joanna Margaret Paul at GFF18

Wed 28 Feb 2018 / 8.45–10.15pm

CCA Cinema, Glasgow
£10.50 / £8.50 (concessions)

UNFORTUNATELY DUE TO EXTREME WEATHER CONDITIONS THIS EVENT HAS NOW BEEN CANCELLED

All my films, poems, paintings play more or less between inner and outer events – Joanna Margaret Paul

Curated by Peter Todd, Through a Different Lens / Film Work by Joanna Margaret Paul is the first collection of Joanna Margaret Paul’s moving image work made available to an international audience. In Todd’s accompanying essay he places her work in the lineage of film-makers Margaret Tait and Robert Bresson, and painter Frances Hodgkins.

Through a Different Lens / Film Work by Joanna Margaret Paul contains 13 works shot in the 1970s that have been transferred from 8mm and 16mm film to high definition video. It was commissioned by CIRCUIT Artist Film and Video Aotearoa New Zealand with the support of Creative New Zealand.

The screening will be followed by a discussion between curator Peter Todd and artist Kate Davis.

The venue has step free access to all floors.

All works supplied courtesy of The Estate of Joanna Margaret Paul, Robert Heald Gallery and CIRCUIT Artist Film and Video Aotearoa New Zealand. Part of Glasgow Film Festival 2018.

Image courtesy of The Estate of Joanna Margaret Paul, Robert Heald Gallery and CIRCUIT Artist Film and Video Aotearoa New Zealand.

Programme

Napkins, 1975. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 3 min 18 sec.

Jillian Dressing, 1976. 16mm film transferred to HD video, 2 min 30 sec.
Shot in a mirror in half-light, Jillian Dressing captures the practiced rituals of dressing.

Task, 1982. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 3 min 11 sec.
A woman irons a piece of child’s clothing, revealing the dexterity and attention gained from repetition of the activity.

Sisterhood, 1975. 16mm film transferred to HD video, 2 min 50 sec.
The dawning of the day across the interior of a shared home and the slow awakening of the occupants.

Seacliff, 1975. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 2 min 58 sec.
Like Barry’s Bay 2, Seacliff captures the worn incursion into landscape of human settlement.

Body/House, 1975. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 10 min 58 sec.
Contrasting the exteriors of buildings with the female body, Body/House is a study of time embedded in form.

Motorway, 1971. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 3 min 35 sec.

Barry’s Bay 2, 1975. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 3 min 30 sec.
A visual diary of Barrys Bay, near Akaroa, New Zealand.

Children Imogen, 1975. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 2 min 57 sec.

Aberhart’s House, 1976. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 2 min 54 sec.
Observations of the Aberhart family home near Akaroa.

Port Chalmers Cycle, 1972. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 17 min 43 sec.
An document of the Otago, New Zealand township of Port Chalmers.

Thorndon, 1975. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 4 min 56 sec.
Opening with an image of a circling crane, Thorndon contrasts the half-constructed shapes and incursions of urban planning with the worn traces of urban settlement.

Napkins, 1975. Super 8mm film transferred to HD video, 3 min 18 sec.

 

Joanna Margaret Paul

Joanna Margaret Paul (1945–2003) was a New Zealand artist who pioneered interdisciplinary practice, working prolifically across the mediums of film, poetry and painting. Often shot and edited in camera, her film work chronicled motherhood and domestic life (Task, Napkins), the worn traces of urban settlement (Port Chalmers Cycle) and the persistent presence of the natural world. Other works such as Sisterhood portrayed the life of other female artists identified with the 1970s women’s movement in New Zealand.

Peter Todd

Peter Todd is a film-maker and curator based in London. He was co-editor of Subjects & Sequences: A Margaret Tait Reader (LUX, 2004), which gathered together new essays on Orcadian film-poet Margaret Tait’s work, interviews, reprints of key poems, a story and texts as well as a detailed filmography, a chronology, a bibliography, and resources. Peter Todd currently works for the British Film Institute. An essay by Peter Todd on the work of Joanna Paul can be found here.