Fed from the fiery springs

Sun 29 Jul 2018 / 7.45–9.15pm

Glasgow Film Theatre
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United by an engagement with the elemental forces of nature on volcanic islands and city streets, Fed from the fiery springs is a programme of artists’ moving image with a new performative lecture from Glasgow based artist Ilana Halperin.

Coinciding with Joan Jonas’s major exhibition at Tate Modern, the programme offers a rare chance to see Jonas’s Volcano Saga (1989) featuring Tilda Swinton in an imaginative retelling of 13th century Icelandic myths, alongside Trisha Baga and Jessie Stead’s take on the conventions of the spaghetti western on a volcanic island in Stromboli (2014) and Cinthia Marcelle’s stoked up tension at a zebra-crossing in Confronto (2005).

The programme will close with a new performative lecture inspired by artist Ilana Halperin’s longstanding geological research. Minerals of New York (2018) sees Halperin work with 18 photographs of the Upper West-side Manhattan street where she grew up, taken by her mother in 1986 prior to its demolition during a wave of gentrification.

Programme:

Joan Jonas, Volcano Saga, 1989. SD Digital File, 29 min.
Trisha Baga and Jessie Stead, Stromboli, 2014. SD Digital File, 10 min.
Cinthia Marcelle, Confronto, 2005. SD Digital File, 8 min.
Ilana Halperin, Minerals of New York, 2018. Performance, 30 min.

Total running time: 77 min.

Fed from the fiery springs has been selected by independent curator and writer Graham Domke, who will give a short introduction to the programme.

Part of GFT’s Crossing the Line strand.

Joan Jonas, Volcano Saga, 1989. Courtesy of the artist and LUX.

About the curator

Graham Domke

Graham Domke, formerly of Dundee Contemporary Arts and Inverleith House, Edinburgh is a freelance curator and writer. He recently curated the exhibition Chamber of Maiden Thought in the new Glasgow studio/gallery Plant, inspired by an 1818 letter by the poet John Keats. His inspiration for Fed from the fiery springs is a Piero di Cosimo painting in the Gemäldegalerie, Berlin and Kenneth Anger’s Lucifer Rising.