Margaret Salmon in Conversation

Wed 21 Oct 2020 / 7.30–8.30pm

Online, Scotland
Free, booking via Eventbrite
Book online

Join us for a conversation between artist Margaret Salmon and Kitty Anderson, Director of LUX Scotland focusing on Margaret’s new work, Lens Diary.

Described as a technician’s diary, Lens Diary is a narrated slide-show slideshow of photographs made in collaboration with G20 Youth Festival, a non-profit youth club based in Maryhill, Glasgow.

In the work, Salmon demonstrates and responds to a set of fixed length lenses starting with a 28mm, then 50mm and finally 85mm. Each lens represents a consecutive day’s shooting, mapping a progressive emotional and physical image-making process realised through time and optical magnification. The 35mm photochemical stills were made in June 2020 and document G20 Youth Festival’s daily program of food distribution and community engagement during Covid-19 in Glasgow.

The event will take place on Zoom with automated transcription via otter.ai.

Lens Diary is available to watch with captions on the LUX Scotland website until 21 November. Captions by Collective Text.

Supported by On & For Production and Distribution, an initiative co-funded by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union.

     


How it works

Our online events will take place on Zoom. The event will be live transcribed using otter.ai live transcription. We will also use the chat space to post questions / comments being raised by the guest artist so they can be referred back to.

We ask that all participants are respectful and listen to the facilitators and other participants. An attendee list will be circulated to all participants in advance of each event. At the beginning of events we will introduce the guest artist and invite participants to briefly introduce themselves and their reason for joining. During the event discussion, we ask that one person speaks at a time and that you type ‘hi’ in the chat to indicate you want to contribute. A member of the LUX Scotland team will keep a track of who wishes to contribute and will direct the conversation to you. You may also wish to use the chat space to type your question or comment, should this be preferable for you. We ask that you keep your microphones on mute until you are going to speak to ensure everyone can hear clearly. We invite you to have your cameras on, where possible, as this maintains a feeling of being together in the space.

If you require support to participate in our online events, or have any questions, please let us know by contacting us on scotland@lux.org.uk or by phoning or texting 0739 4042 450, and we will be happy to assist.

LUX Scotland is dedicated to providing a welcoming online environment for everyone, regardless of gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, or religion or belief. Participants who do not adhere to this code of conduct and the participation guidelines will be asked to leave the event.


 

We welcome feedback on how these online events have been organised and facilitated in order to improve them as we go forward, in acknowledgment that this is a learning curve and adjustment period for us all. An evaluation form will be circulated at the end of the event along with any references, links or materials brought up during the discussion.

G20.14
Image: Margaret Salmon, Untitled, 2020. Courtesy the artist.

About the artist

Margaret Salmon

Born in 1975 in Suffern, New York, Margaret Salmon lives and works in Glasgow, Scotland. She creates filmic portraits that weave together poetry and ethnography. Focusing on individuals in their everyday activities, her films capture the minutiae of daily life and infuse them with gentle grandeur, touching upon universal human themes. Adapting techniques drawn from various cinematic movements, such as Cinema Vérité, the European Avant Garde and Italian Neo-Realism, Salmon’s orchestrations of sound and image introduce a formal abstraction into the tradition of realist film. Margaret Salmon won the first Max Mara Art Prize for Women in 2006. Her work was shown at the Venice Biennale in 2007 and the Berlin Biennale in 2010 and was featured in individual exhibitions at Witte de With in Rotterdam and Whitechapel Gallery in London among others.