CANCELLED: Second Sight: Dreaming Rivers at GSFF20

Fri 20 Mar 2020 / 7pm

CCA Cinema , 350 Sauchiehall Street Glasgow
£2–8, booking via Glasgow Short Film Festival
Book online

A key film of the UK Black Film Workshop Movement, Martina Attille’s Dreaming Rivers (1988) illustrates the spirit of modern families touched by the experience of migration. Awarded a prestigious Filmdukaten at the XXXVII Internationale Filmwoche Mannheim in 1988, the film evocatively weaves together the ambition-fuelled dreams and memories of Caribbean-born Miss T and her family.

Dreaming Rivers will be screened alongside two films by Glasgow based artist, filmmaker and programmer, Tako Taal, who will also introduce the screening.


The Centre for Contemporary Art (CCA) is located on Sauchiehall Street, accessible via Cowcaddens subway station, Charing Cross train station, and 3, 4/4A, 18 and 19 bus services. There is limited on street parking diagonally opposite CCA on Pitt Street, and bicycle racks located on Sauchiehall Street. The cinema is located on the ground floor of the CCA and has step-free access from the entrance on Sauchiehall Street. There are accessible and gender neutral toilets located on the ground and first floors. Further venue access information can be found on the CCA website.

Martina Attille for Sankofa Film and Video, Roderick Hart, Nimmy March, Angela Wynter in Dreaming Rivers, 1988. Courtesy of the artist and Christine Parry

About the artist

Martina Attille

Martina Attille is currently an AHRC TECHNE PhD Candidate at UAL LCC, registered in her preferred name, Judah.

Tako Taal

Tako Taal is a Welsh-­Gambian visual artist and filmmaker, currently undertaking a two­-year residency with Talbot Rice Gallery at the University of Edinburgh.

Taal navigates historic and neocolonial forms to consider strategies for recovery and repair. As a material performance of belonging her work evokes cited, spectral and physical bodies to undermine History, destabilise images and disrupt identity. Taal exercises her body to enter diasporic and imperial lacuna, in the belief that the labour undertaken to straddle a gap is critical to its understanding. Whispered anecdotes and artefacts from family archives are navigated and reconstructed to trace shifts that merge and split boundaries between body, land and state.

From 2016­-18 Tako was a programmer at Market Gallery, Glasgow. Her films have been in competition at the 14th Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival and Glasgow Short Film Festival. Recent exhibitions include; Inherited Premises, Grand Union (Birmingham) and Compound, Intermedia Gallery, CCA Glasgow.